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Papers of Linda Armstrong relating to the history of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists

  • GB 249 ARM
  • Coleção
  • 2020 - 2021

Collection of papers created by Linda Armstrong, and some collaboration by Jois Stansfield: researchers interested in the history of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, and the Speech and Language Therapy profession in general.

Papers were researched and created between 1999 - 2021 and many were revised and edited just prior to deposit in January 2021. Sources used for the research included the papers of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists held within the University of Strathclyde Archives and Special Collections, and also papers and files still held by the College.

The papers comprise: lists covering a range of historical areas relating to the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists and the profession in general such as Journal articles, College conferences, and committee members; and analytical articles covering topics such as how the College was formed, the change in the name of the profession, and analysis of the content of the College’s news bulletin.

Armstrong, Linda, b.1960, speech and language therapist

Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow lectures

  • GB 249 RPSG
  • Coleção
  • 2017 - 2020

Digital recordings of lectures, plus abstracts of lectures and biographies of speakers, from the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow's 216th, 217th and 218th lecture series.

Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow

Giving voice. An oral history of British women who qualified as speech therapists between 1945 and 1970.

  • GB 249 SOHC 37
  • Coleção
  • 2017 - 2019

Oral history project carried out by Jois Stansfield for MSc Health History at University of Strathclyde.

This is believed to be the first oral history of speech and language therapy in the UK. Early members of the speech and language therapy profession were recruited from retirement networks and via the professional body, the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. Interviews were held across England and Scotland, taking a life-story approach with each participant. Personal testimony, previously unheard, from these pioneers of the profession demonstrates the degree to which these women were products of their age, class and gender and the individual ways in which they negotiated challenges in their personal and professional lives.

Stansfield, Jois, b.1951, speech therapy historian

'Doctor's orders' oral history project

  • GB 249 SOHC 64
  • Coleção
  • 2017 - 2019

Thirty interviews conducted by Stuart Bradwel as part of the Wellcome Trust-funded PhD studentship at the University of Strathclyde ‘Doctors Orders’ – Type 1 Diabetes and the Consultative Relationship, 1965-2002.

Whereas early physicians approached Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) in the paternalistic fashion common to mid-twentieth century practice and expected strict obedience to prescribed treatment, in 2002 the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme was initiated. This reconceptualised the professional as a remote source of support while encouraging those with T1DM to take an active role in determining the character of treatment, adjusting their own dosages of insulin and dietary intake as necessary on a day-to-day basis. Consequently, the traditionally passive ‘patient’ was transformed into a legitimately meaningful actor with the power to refine therapy according to their own subjective values and priorities.

The project investigated the nature of this transition from physician- to patient-led care in orthodox T1DM management, making particular reference to a process of ideological evolution within the medical profession in light of growing evidence that an empowered patient-body led to superior clinical outcomes. There is little printed evidence concerning the lay-experience of T1DM, while professional volumes tend to be heavily editorialised. Consequently, oral history – from both those with T1DM and professionals – was identified as a promising methodological framework with considerable potential to produce valuable evidence. A total of thirty interviews (19 with people living with type 1 diabetes, 7 with healthcare professionals, and 4 with professionals with the condition) were conducted between 5th May 2017 and 3rd July 2019.

Bradwel, Stuart, PhD student at University of Strathclyde

Oral history project exploring the impact of asbestos in Glasgow

  • GB 249 SOHC 38
  • Coleção
  • 2019

Ongoing oral history project being carried out by Stellar Quines, a Scottish theatre company.

In the autumn of 2019, Stellar Quines created and toured 'Fibres', a play by Frances Poet about the impact of the shipyards and asbestos on a Glasgow family. It was inspired by a true story and mirrored hundreds of similar stories in Glasgow and the rest of the UK. In addition to producing the play, the company collaborated with Clydeside Action on Asbestos, one of Glasgow’s primary support services for those impacted by asbestos, to undertake an oral history project to gather some of those Glasgow stories .

The interviewer is Rosie Priest, Creative Learning Associate, Stellar Quines.

Stellar Quines

John Cross papers

  • GB 249 JCE/22/5/16
  • Coleção
  • 1948 - c 1954
  • Lecture notes for a Junior School Physical Training Lesson (typescript, 8 pages);
  • List of gymnastic exercises comprising a 'P[hysical] T[raining] Competition' for a class of school children, with instuctions for pupil and teacher actions (typescript, 1 page);
  • Three photographs of students of the Scottish School of Physical Education at Jordanhill College of Education, performing exercises in the gym, c 1949 (black and white: 133 x 84 mm, 85 x 55 mm and 91 x 55 mm). With original Kodak paper wallet from the Drug and Dispensing Department, Dalziel Co-operative Society Ltd., 34 Brandon Street, Motherwell, annotated 'J.M. Cross';
  • Photograph of the Jordanhill Training College Rugby Football Club for session 1948-1949, mounted on card (black and white: 195 x 125 mm on 300 x 248 mm mount). A key of names is printed on the mount. John Cross is pictured in the back row, third from left. Photograph by Weir, Glasgow;
  • Photograph of Scottish School of Physical Education students and staff in dress uniform, mounted on card (black and white: 25 x 150 mm on 298 x 247 mm mount). Taken in front of the David Stow Building on the Jordanhill Campus, c 1949. Photograph by Weir, Glasgow;
  • Photograph of 15 members of the Jordanhill Training College Rugby Football Club and 2 members of staff, taken on a playing field, c 1954. John Cross is pictured in the back row, fourth from left. Annotated 'J. Cross' on the reverse. With partial key of names;
  • Group photograph, possibly of students and staff of the Scottish School of Physical Education in the grounds at Jordanhill, c 1949 (black and white, 140 x 89 mm);
  • Photograph of the Motherwell Amateur Swimming and Water Polo Club team with the British Amateur Water Polo Championship shield, taken in 1951 or 1952 (the team won the Championship in both years). John Cross is pictured in the back row, second from right. Key of names on reverse. Copyright: Action Photos by H.W. Neale, 95 Mallinson Road, Battersea, London (black and white, 215 x 165 mm).

Cross, John Miller, 1927-1999, teacher

Oral history project on women’s experiences of work and closure at James Templeton & Company Ltd, Glasgow, c. 1960-1981

  • GB 249 SOHC 32
  • Coleção
  • May - September 2018

Oral history project, conducted in May - September 2018 by Rory Stride, with women formerly employed at James Templeton & Co., carpet manufacturers, between c. 1960 and 1981. A total of six women were interviewed. The interviews last approximately between 45 minutes and 1 hour 15 minutes and were conducted at a variety of places across Scotland. The interview questions were semi-structured and largely directed by the responses of the participants.

The interviews focus on the women’s working lives and their first experiences of employment after secondary school but specifically exploring their experience of work at James Templeton & Co., the preeminent carpet manufacturers in Glasgow during the 1960s and 1970s. The company had seven factories, located in the east end and southside of Glasgow with the company’s Crown Street factory being the last to close in early 1981 when Templeton Carpets amalgamated with Stoddard Carpets. Topics discussed include trade unions, working conditions, gender divisions in labour, staff camaraderie, management and staff relationships, and periods of redundancy, unemployment and re-employment after leaving James Templeton & Co. The interviews also cover the women's feelings and opinions regarding the gentrification and redevelopment of the former headquarters and factory of James Templeton & Co. located at Templeton Street on the north eastern edge of Glasgow Green.

University of Strathclyde | Scottish Oral History Centre

Ross Priory Club records

  • GB 249 OK/7
  • Coleção
  • 1973 - 2017

Annual general meeting minutes and papers, 1974-2017; constitution and bye-laws, 1977-2006; Committee of Management minutes and correspondence, 1973-1995; Finance Committee Ross Priory Subcommittee minutes and papers, 1979, 1982; newsletters, 1977-1986; publicity leaflet, [1974]; nature trail guide, 1974; notices to University of Strathclyde staff about Ross Priory Club Angling Section, 1982-1995; silver jubilee birthday party admission programme, 1996.

Ross Priory Club

Scottish Oral History Centre Archive

  • GB 249 SOHC
  • Coleção
  • c. 1981 - present

The Scottish Oral History Centre Archive is an extensive collection of oral history recordings focussing on the history of work, occupational health and the social impact of de-industrialisation. Most of the recordings originate from projects carried out by Scottish Oral History Centre staff and students but there are also large collections of interviews originating from other organisations, for example Glasgow Museums and the Scottish Working People’s History Trust.

University of Strathclyde | Scottish Oral History Centre

Get a Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway

  • GB 249 SOHC 36
  • Coleção
  • 2017

‘Get A Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway’ was an eighteen month oral history project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and carried out by the Chinese Community Development Partnership. The aim of the project was to record the experiences of the older generation of Chinese people who migrated to the UK after 1950 and how they survived in an environment completely new and strange to them.

Fifteen elderly people from Chinese communities in the central belt of Scotland were interviewed by volunteer researchers in 2017. Almost all of the interviewees were born in Hong Kong and migrated to the United Kingdom after 1950. At that time, life was not easy in Hong King even in the city. In the rural areas where facilities were very limited, it was even worse. In these remote areas, young people lacked education and job opportunities. Unable to earn a living, many villagers tried to build a new life in the United Kingdom. After working hard for several years and saving up enough money, many set up Chinese restaurants and takeaway food shops. Working long hours in these eateries, many found it difficult to find enough time to learn English. Although managing to pick up some basic English in their daily life, language remained a big barrier and restricted their ability to integrate into wider society. By interviewing members of this ‘hidden community’ as the older Chinese community in Scotland has sometimes been described, the project hoped to help the public better understand their courage and determination and to change attitudes that had arisen towards the community due to a lack of understanding.

The interviews focus on the interviewees’ lives before they emigrated, their early experiences of living in Scotland, their current lives and the changes in Scottish society witnessed by them.

The culmination of the project was the publication of a book in both Cantonese and English recounting the interviewees' stories.

The collection comprises:

  • 15 recorded interviews (in Cantonese)
  • Time-coded summaries (in English)
  • Publication: Mitford, T. (ed.) (2019) Get a Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway. Chinese Community Development Partnership.

Chinese Community Development Partnership

EU (European Union) referendum 2016 campaign literature

  • GB 249 T-EUREF
  • Coleção
  • 2016

Material produced in connection with the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum on 23rd June 2016. The question on the ballot paper was 'Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?'. The collection comprises communications circulated in Scotland and produced by the remain and leave campaigns.

Oral history project on the changing work identity of Govan's shipbuilders c. 1960-2016

  • GB 249 SOHC 33
  • Coleção
  • August - October 2016

Oral history project conducted in 2016 by Rory Stride as research for his undergraduate history dissertation, ‘“Proud to be a Clyde shipbuilder. Clyde built”: The changing work identity of Govan’s shipbuilders, c.1960-present.’ The collection comprises interviews with seven men who were employed as shipbuilders between c.1960 and 2016 at Govan’s three shipyards: Alexander Stephen and Sons, Fairfield’s, and Harland and Wolff. The interviews were conducted in a variety of places across Glasgow. The interview questions were semi-structured and largely directed by the responses of the participants. Topics discussed include trade unions, working conditions, occupational injury, masculinity, politics, staff camaraderie, redundancy and periods of employment at different companies. There is a focus throughout the interviews on indicators and expression of masculine identity including alcohol consumption, paid employment and macho attitudes in the yards. The interviews also cover the workers' interactions with the trade union movement, focusing on their experiences of strike action. In addition, some of the key episodes in the Clyde’s shipbuilding history during the twentieth century are covered including: the closure of Harland and Wolff; the closure of Alexander Stephen and Sons; the Norwegian company Kvaerner’s takeover of the Fairfield yard from British Shipbuilders in 1988 and the withdrawal of Kvaerner from Govan in 1999 which threatened the existence of shipbuilding on the Clyde heading in to the twenty-first century.

Stride, Rory, fl. 2016, student at University of Strathclyde

Greater Manchester Asbestos Victims Support Group oral history project

  • GB 249 SOHC 30
  • Coleção
  • 2014 - 2015

Oral history project, conducted in 2014-2015 by Nigel Ingham of the Open University on behalf of the Greater Manchester Asbestos Victims Support Group, interviewing members of the Group.

There were 7 interviews in total and the collection comprises audio recordings, full transcripts, summaries and photographs for all interviews.

The interviewees comprise 5 women, widowed through mesothelioma (an asbestos-related disease), and 2 men who at the time were current sufferers. Of the 5 widows, 3 had been bereaved for up to 10 years, while two others lost their respective loved ones in the previous 12 months.

The interviews cover life story details, the social and economic context in which asbestos exposure occurred, the patient journey with mesothelioma, as well as the individual, emotional, family and social impact of the disease. Heavy industries such as textile mills, power stations are featured in the material, as well as shops, schools, and other 'lighter' contexts. The trades of those exposed to asbestos include electrical engineering, painting and decorating, joinery, shopfitting, bricklaying and tiling.

Geographically, the material predominantly covers Lancashire and Greater Manchester, but also references London.

Temporally, the material covers the decades following World War II up to approximately 2015.

Greater Manchester Asbestos Victims Support Group

Scottish independence referendum 2014 campaign literature

  • GB 249 T-SI
  • Coleção
  • 2014

Material produced in connection with the Scottish Independence Referendum on 18th September 2014. The question on the ballot paper was 'Should Scotland be an independent country?'. The collection comprises communications produced by the Yes and No campaigns and various other interest groups.

University of Strathclyde Graduates Association records

  • GB 249 OK/9
  • Coleção
  • 1936 - 2013

Annual general meeting minutes; Council minutes; constitution and rules; lists of members and office bearers; syllabuses of meetings; annual accounts; newsletters; correspondence; menu and toast list; photograph of badminton team; Students' Union Appeal circular; membership application form; membership card; papers on appeal campaign and membership; address to Association; letter and invitation relating to Association's golden jubilee; centenary ball poster; St. Andrew's Night ball programme; presidents' badges; Association tie; designs for Association tie; Malawi Millennium Fashion Show programme.

University of Strathclyde Graduates Association

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