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Oral history project exploring the impact of asbestos in Glasgow

  • GB 249 SOHC 38
  • Collectie
  • 2019

Ongoing oral history project being carried out by Stellar Quines, a Scottish theatre company.

In the autumn of 2019, Stellar Quines created and toured 'Fibres', a play by Frances Poet about the impact of the shipyards and asbestos on a Glasgow family. It was inspired by a true story and mirrored hundreds of similar stories in Glasgow and the rest of the UK. In addition to producing the play, the company collaborated with Clydeside Action on Asbestos, one of Glasgow’s primary support services for those impacted by asbestos, to undertake an oral history project to gather some of those Glasgow stories .

The interviewer is Rosie Priest, Creative Learning Associate, Stellar Quines.

Stellar Quines

Scottish School of Physical Education reunion book, 1968-2018

  • GB 249 JCE/22/7/11
  • Stuk
  • 2018

Privately printed volume containing an illustrated collection of student reminiscences and life stories, produced for the 50th anniversary reunion of those who qualified from the Scottish School of Physical Education, Jordanhill College of Education in 1968. The volume contains contributions from 47 former students, plus a paper on 'Power, Control and Status in Physical Education' by Dr Ian Thomson. Compiled by Drew Michie between September 2017 and May 2018.

Michie, Andrew Johnston, b 1946, teacher and education adviser

Interview with Phyllis Craig, Chair of Clydeside Action on Asbestos

  • GB 249 SOHC 35
  • Bestanddeel
  • 28 January 2018

Recording of Arthur McIvor in conversation with Phyllis Craig, Chair of Clydeside Action on Asbestos, 28 January 2018. Phyllis Craig describes her work at the charity where she started on 2 October 1995.

[00:00] Introductions.
[00:25] Summarises main life events.
[01:14] Describes voluntary work at Castlemilk law centre and the poverty she observed.
[01:43] Describes starting work at Clydeside Action on Asbestos.
[02.44] Discusses the occupations of her parents and her relationship with them.
[05:10] Describes roles at Clydeside Action on Asbestos.
[06:04] Tells story of a particular appeal and the treatment of a client.
[07:28] Returns to description of activity of Clydeside Action on Asbestos.
[07:53] Mentions the case of ‘Fairchild, Matthew and Fox’ and describes other asbestosis cases.
[10:58] Describes the wide variety of other Clydeside Action on Asbestos activities, such as fundraising and communications.
[11:56] Describes how the job has changed over the years.
[13:17] Describes how the resources and funding have improved since the early years of the charity.
[13:54] Describes the psychological effects of a mesothelioma diagnosis.
[16:12] Describes the experiences of those living with mesothelioma.
[18:59] Describes the physical and mental effects of mesothelioma.
[20:20] Talks about the limitations of new government disability legislation and its relation to the mental health of sufferers.
[22:15] Mentions the economic schemes that were available to help sufferers and remarks upon the likely negative effects of recent government legislation.
[23:06] Describes the rise of diagnoses of mesothelioma in women, explores the reasons, and talks about the different experiences of the disease for men and women.
[25:45] Describes the difficulties of competing with other charities for funding for example charities that work with victims of post-traumatic stress.
[27:07] Tells the story of a particular mesothelioma case pertaining to a male client who was a Glasgow joiner.
[30:11] Tells the story of two mesothelioma cases pertaining to women, one client from Falkirk who struggled to get a diagnosis and a former GP who works in the charity office. Phyllis comments on the different reactions of men and women to a diagnosis of mesothelioma.
[32:46] States that mesothelioma is still incurable and describes the general life expectancy of sufferers.
[34:47] Describes the dramatic changes in medical interest and treatments for mesothelioma since 1995. Also discusses surgery and the importance of palliative care.
[38:55] Describes the differences between Scotland and England in terms of legislation and compensation. Also describes the tenacity required to campaign for justice.
[42:30] Describes the reasons why legislative situation has evolved further, to the benefit of victims, in Scotland than in England.
[46:11] Discusses how the establishment of the Scottish Parliament has benefited the experience of victims in Scotland and how Scotland’s asbestos legislation compares globally.
[47:43] Describes the current campaigns and activity of Clydeside Action on Asbestos.
[50:59] Closing remarks upon the importance of the recognition of other asbestos related lung cancers in addition to mesothelioma, in terms of legislation and support.
[52:53] Describes inaccuracies in predictions for when the peak of asbestos-related deaths will be seen.

University of Strathclyde | Scottish Oral History Centre

Sweden

  • GB 249 T-GED/22/1
  • Reeks
  • No date

2 lithograph representations of Gothenburg, 2 engravings of Stockholm, and 1 engraving of Norrköping in eastern Sweden.

This series is part of Patrick Geddes’ large collection of maps, plans, photographs, prints and drawings of countries and regions around the world. Much of this collection was part of Geddes' Cities and Town Planning Exhibition.

Geddes, Sir Patrick, 1854-1932, Knight, biologist, sociologist, educationist and town planner

Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow lectures

  • GB 249 RPSG
  • Collectie
  • 2017 - 2020

Digital recordings of lectures, plus abstracts of lectures and biographies of speakers, from the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow's 216th, 217th and 218th lecture series.

Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow

Campus Update

  • GB 249 OS/66/8
  • Stuk
  • 2017

Outlines several recently completed projects to transform the campus of the University of Strathclyde (the new Technology and Innovation Centre and the refurbishment of the Business School, John Anderson and James Weir buildings), plus upcoming campus investments (a new sports and health facility, a teaching and learning hub bringing together the former Architecture and Colville buildings, refurbishment of the Wolfson building, and the installation of a state-of-the-art district energy system for the campus, including a combined heat and power engine).

University of Strathclyde | Media and Corporate Communications

Digital images of 15th Kilbrandon Lecture at University of Strathclyde

  • GB 249 OS/94/4/1
  • Reeks
  • 23 November 2017

Digital images of 15th Kilbrandon Lecture, 23 November 2017, at University of Strathclyde, delivered by Rt. Hon. Nicola Sturgeon, MSP, First Minister of Scotland. The lecture was opened by Professor Sir Jim McDonald, Vice Chancellor of the University of Strathclyde, chaired by Professor Jennifer Davidson, Executive Director of the Institute for Inspiring Children’s Futures, and the vote of thanks and closing remarks were given by Fiona Duncan, Chair, Care Review for Scotland. The images were taken by Guy Hinks, photographer.

The Kilbrandon Lecture is an annual lecture to commemorate the contribution to public life and the Scottish legal system of Charles Shaw, Lord Kilbrandon.

University of Strathclyde | Media and Corporate Communications

'Doctor's orders' oral history project

  • GB 249 SOHC 64
  • Collectie
  • 2017 - 2019

Thirty interviews conducted by Stuart Bradwel as part of the Wellcome Trust-funded PhD studentship at the University of Strathclyde ‘Doctors Orders’ – Type 1 Diabetes and the Consultative Relationship, 1965-2002.

Whereas early physicians approached Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) in the paternalistic fashion common to mid-twentieth century practice and expected strict obedience to prescribed treatment, in 2002 the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme was initiated. This reconceptualised the professional as a remote source of support while encouraging those with T1DM to take an active role in determining the character of treatment, adjusting their own dosages of insulin and dietary intake as necessary on a day-to-day basis. Consequently, the traditionally passive ‘patient’ was transformed into a legitimately meaningful actor with the power to refine therapy according to their own subjective values and priorities.

The project investigated the nature of this transition from physician- to patient-led care in orthodox T1DM management, making particular reference to a process of ideological evolution within the medical profession in light of growing evidence that an empowered patient-body led to superior clinical outcomes. There is little printed evidence concerning the lay-experience of T1DM, while professional volumes tend to be heavily editorialised. Consequently, oral history – from both those with T1DM and professionals – was identified as a promising methodological framework with considerable potential to produce valuable evidence. A total of thirty interviews (19 with people living with type 1 diabetes, 7 with healthcare professionals, and 4 with professionals with the condition) were conducted between 5th May 2017 and 3rd July 2019.

Bradwel, Stuart, PhD student at University of Strathclyde

Get a Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway

  • GB 249 SOHC 36
  • Collectie
  • 2017

‘Get A Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway’ was an eighteen month oral history project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and carried out by the Chinese Community Development Partnership. The aim of the project was to record the experiences of the older generation of Chinese people who migrated to the UK after 1950 and how they survived in an environment completely new and strange to them.

Fifteen elderly people from Chinese communities in the central belt of Scotland were interviewed by volunteer researchers in 2017. Almost all of the interviewees were born in Hong Kong and migrated to the United Kingdom after 1950. At that time, life was not easy in Hong King even in the city. In the rural areas where facilities were very limited, it was even worse. In these remote areas, young people lacked education and job opportunities. Unable to earn a living, many villagers tried to build a new life in the United Kingdom. After working hard for several years and saving up enough money, many set up Chinese restaurants and takeaway food shops. Working long hours in these eateries, many found it difficult to find enough time to learn English. Although managing to pick up some basic English in their daily life, language remained a big barrier and restricted their ability to integrate into wider society. By interviewing members of this ‘hidden community’ as the older Chinese community in Scotland has sometimes been described, the project hoped to help the public better understand their courage and determination and to change attitudes that had arisen towards the community due to a lack of understanding.

The interviews focus on the interviewees’ lives before they emigrated, their early experiences of living in Scotland, their current lives and the changes in Scottish society witnessed by them.

The culmination of the project was the publication of a book in both Cantonese and English recounting the interviewees' stories.

The collection comprises:

  • 15 recorded interviews (in Cantonese)
  • Time-coded summaries (in English)
  • Publication: Mitford, T. (ed.) (2019) Get a Chinese: stories of the Chinese community inside and outside the Chinese takeaway. Chinese Community Development Partnership.

Chinese Community Development Partnership

EU (European Union) referendum 2016 campaign literature

  • GB 249 T-EUREF
  • Collectie
  • 2016

Material produced in connection with the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum on 23rd June 2016. The question on the ballot paper was 'Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?'. The collection comprises communications circulated in Scotland and produced by the remain and leave campaigns.

Oral history project on the changing work identity of Govan's shipbuilders c. 1960-2016

  • GB 249 SOHC 33
  • Collectie
  • August - October 2016

Oral history project conducted in 2016 by Rory Stride as research for his undergraduate history dissertation, ‘“Proud to be a Clyde shipbuilder. Clyde built”: The changing work identity of Govan’s shipbuilders, c.1960-present.’ The collection comprises interviews with seven men who were employed as shipbuilders between c.1960 and 2016 at Govan’s three shipyards: Alexander Stephen and Sons, Fairfield’s, and Harland and Wolff. The interviews were conducted in a variety of places across Glasgow. The interview questions were semi-structured and largely directed by the responses of the participants. Topics discussed include trade unions, working conditions, occupational injury, masculinity, politics, staff camaraderie, redundancy and periods of employment at different companies. There is a focus throughout the interviews on indicators and expression of masculine identity including alcohol consumption, paid employment and macho attitudes in the yards. The interviews also cover the workers' interactions with the trade union movement, focusing on their experiences of strike action. In addition, some of the key episodes in the Clyde’s shipbuilding history during the twentieth century are covered including: the closure of Harland and Wolff; the closure of Alexander Stephen and Sons; the Norwegian company Kvaerner’s takeover of the Fairfield yard from British Shipbuilders in 1988 and the withdrawal of Kvaerner from Govan in 1999 which threatened the existence of shipbuilding on the Clyde heading in to the twenty-first century.

Stride, Rory, fl. 2016, student at University of Strathclyde

Our Values: people-oriented, bold, innovative, collaborative, ambitious

  • GB 249 OS/37/13
  • Stuk
  • 2015

Brochure produced as a reference document for staff, to help them consider how best they could contribute to making the Strathclyde Values work to the benefit of the University, its staff and students, its collaborators, and the wider community.

University of Strathclyde | Human Resources

University of Strathclyde Golden Jubilee graduation cap

  • GB 249 OS/90/11
  • Bestanddeel
  • 2014

Fabric design sample for the University of Strathclyde Golden Jubilee graduation cap; 2-page digital file summarising the design and manufacturing process.
The Golden Jubilee cap was a gift from Glasgow School of Art to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the University of Strathclyde’s Royal Charter of 1964. It was designed and manufactured by Christopher Barton and Jonathan Douglas, two final-year students in the School’s Department of Fashion and Textiles, and has been used in place of the more traditional, black cap at all University of Strathclyde graduation ceremonies since 2014. While the fabric of the finished cap is dark blue and black in colour, the sample is rendered in cream and black. The fabric was created using the Jacquard mechanism and woven from Lyocell, a type of rayon consisting of cellulose fibre made from dissolving wood pulp. This newly developed, natural yarn was chosen by the designers in honour of Strathclyde’s reputation for technological innovation, as well as to fit with the University’s sustainability policy, which seeks to minimise any detrimental effect upon the environment arising from the University’s activities. The design incorporates several key elements of the University’s coat of Arms: a cinquefoil, the heraldic emblem of the ancient kingdom of Strathclyde after which the University was named; an antique crown, again representing the kingdom of Strathclyde; a wave packet, signifying that Strathclyde is a technological institution; and two falcons, which were added to the coat of Arms in 1996 to mark two hundred years since the death of John Anderson.

Glasgow School of Art

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