Showing 2019 results

names

Allan, J. Malcolm, b. 1935, librarian

  • P0060
  • Person

Malcolm Allan was librarian of the Scottish College of Commerce from 1967 to 1973. He subsequently became assistant librarian at the University of Strathclyde.

Allen, Laurie, Kazan-, b. 1947, anti-asbestos campaigner

  • P0818
  • Person
  • b. 1947

Laurie Kazan-Allen studied history at Brandeis University (BA 1969). She is the founding editor, in 1990, of the 'British asbestos newsletter' (BAN), a quarterly publication distributed to victim support groups, environmentalists, solicitors, academics, medical personnel and research bodies in over thirty countries. Since 1999, Kazan-Allen has been as the coordinator of the International Ban Asbestos Secretariat. She is the sister of American asbestos litigator Steven Kazan.

Anderson College of Medicine, Glasgow

  • C0051
  • Corporate body
  • 1887-1947

The Anderson College of Medicine had its origins in 1799 as the Medical Faculty of Anderson's Institution, Glasgow. Following the restructuring of technical education in Glasgow in 1887, the Medical School became a separate institution, called Anderson's College Medical School. In 1889, the School relocated to a new building near the Western Infirmary, designed by the architects, Honeyman and Keppie. In 1913, the School changed its name to the Anderson College of Medicine. Following the establishment of the National Health Service in 1947, the School amalgamated with the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Glasgow.

Anderson, John, 1726-1796, natural philosopher

  • P0036
  • Person
  • 1726-1796

John Anderson (1726-1796) was born at Rosneath, Dunbartonshire, the grandson of the Reverend John Anderson (1668-1721), Preceptor to the Duke of Argyll and first minister of St David's Ramshorn Church in Glasgow and son of the Reverend James Anderson, minister of Rosneath. Following the early death of his father, Anderson was brought up by an aunt in Stirling and later attended Glasgow University, where he graduated in 1745. Following employment as tutor to several young gentlemen, Anderson was appointed Professor of Oriental Languages at the College or University of Glasgow in 1755 and transferred to the Chair of Natural Philosophy in 1757.

Anderson had a wide range of interests - in natural philosophy, natural history, antiquities and ballistics and military engineering - and was a prolific writer and inventor. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society and was a friend of Benjamin Franklin and many other scientists of the day. He installed the first lightning conductor in Glasgow, on the College steeple.

Glasgow in the 18th century was a centre of the Industrial Revolution and Anderson realised the need to encourage technical education. He gave an evening class in experimental philosophy open to the mechanics in the city, which proved to be so popular that the lecture room had to be twice extended to accommodate the numbers wishing to attend. He was an inspired teacher and was nicknamed 'Jolly Jack Phosphorus' by his students. He was associated with James Watt and encouraged the latter's revolutionary work on the steam engine.

Anderson found himself often at odds with his colleagues in Glasgow University over matters of governance and their hostility, as he saw it, to new ideas, and some of these disputes ended in lawsuits. In 1795 he drew up a detailed plan in his will for a new University to be founded in Glasgow, which would be 'a place of useful learning'. Even women would be welcome to attend classes. After his death in January 1796 his trustees, although left with insufficient funds, were able to establish Anderson's Institution, which evolved into the present day University of Strathclyde.

Anderson, Sir David Stirling, 1895-1981, engineer and educationist

  • P0037
  • Person
  • 1895-1981

Sir David Anderson graduated Associate in Mechanical Engineering of the Royal Technical College, Glasgow in 1921, following service in the Royal Air Force, with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant, in 1918. He obtained engineering experience with the North British Locomotive Company and with Fullerton, Hodgart and Barclay, then held several higher academic posts in Derby Technical College and Birmingham College of Technology, before becoming Director or Principal of the Royal Technical College, Glasgow from 1946 to 1959. During his term of office, discussions took place on the expansion of technological education in Britain, and the future development of the Royal College, which led eventually to the award of University Charter and the establishment of the University of Strathclyde in 1964.

Sir David was knighted in 1957 and received honorary degrees from Glasgow University in 1961 and from Strathclyde in 1965. He served as a member of the Robbins Committee on Higher Education and on many other professional bodies. He died on 18 January 1981.

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